Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Iowa Historical Building

Today I went to the Iowa Historical Museum in Des Moines. It is a nice, newer building - a far cry from the building I went to as a child. That was pretty much like an overstuffed attic.



You notice this airplane in the atrium.



Here's another one. They remind you of an ultra light airplane. Notice the frame and even the propellers are made of wood.



You have to have a stage coach. I looked at this pretty closely and determined it would be a hard way to go across country.



But it was probably a lot faster and more comfortable that the Conestoga wagon -- the schooner of the prairie. I was surprised at how tall these wagons are - the back wheels are about six feet high.



Okay. These buffalo are not real, are they? They are ... big.



Des Moines does not have Sue the Tyrannosaurus Rex at the Chicago Field Museum of Natural History, but it does have this 14-tall skeleton of a woolly mammoth.



These animals were similar to elephants and were huge.



Fast forwarding in time, I liked this old pay phone.



This gas pump was interesting -- and the price of gasoline was 17.6 cents a gallon.



Here's a cartoon drawn by Ding Darling, a famous political cartoonist for the Des Moines Register for many years.



Looking out the window you could see the top of the Iowa Capitol Building. There was a large rally gathering to protest something or other.



As I was looking at history, there were people across the street making it.

Take care and thanks for stopping by.

8 comments:

A Lady's Life said...

No kiddin.
Those were pretty nice wagons and well preserved too.
I couldn't imagine flying in an airplane like that but we have people doing that right now in a farmers field Once in a while they crash and people die but like sky kiting, it looks like a lot of fun.

Cloudia said...

Warm Aloha & Gratitude from Honolulu!


Comfort Spiral

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Jo said...

Oh, how fabulously interesting! I had no idea such a museum existed. I think it would have been amazing to take one of those wagons across the country. You'd certainly see all the sights -- not like flying over everything. I remember when I was a little girl, listening to the story of Johnny Appleseed, and the song they sang:

"Oh, Get on the wagon rollin' west
Out to the great unknown
Get on the wagon rollin' west
Or you'll be left alone
Get on the wagon rollin' west
Or you'll be left alone"


I imagined these wonderful covered wagons, rolling west.

Marge said...

After being out west, I cannot imagine the trip those brave souls endured on their journey west. How they could head out into the vast barren land, willed with sagebrush and cactus and rattlesnakes is beyond me. And staying further to the north just added thousands of feet to the height of the mountains. I really admire the early pioneers. They were made of better stuff than I am.

I've missed you, Russell! I'm glad you posted.

Pauline said...

I like that last line - isn't that always the way? We are history; we don't see ourselves that way but others will. Thanks for the tour.

Small City Scenes said...

Excellent post--as usual.

Nice to 'see' you again--we all have missed you.

I do like museums and this one is filled with the good stuff. But in a super-ultra modern building. I wonder if in 100 years people will call it old fashioned.

I am going to head down the hill and go see what type of material that fence. It is very white. I like the barn too.

You must visit on Tuesday--it is barn day. MaryBeth

Small City Scenes said...

PS: I remember you showing pics of Cody. I hope his feet issues are soon solved. MB

Snappy Di said...

I suppose if a person wanted to take all of their household possessions then they would choose the conestoga style wagons. I had no idea they were so big!

Di